Benchmarking!!

benchmarking

Benchmarking is how we establish where we are, where we have been and where we are going. Prior to this module I had heard the term benchmarking and had a general idea that it was a means of measuring performance. This weeks lessons, discussions and critical thinking exercises expanded my knowledge and helped me to understand how critical benchmarking is to healthcare.

Benchmarks must be measurable, but more than that they must be specific to what you are trying to accomplish overall. Setting a benchmark for decreasing infection rates and then measuring call light responsiveness isn’t going to help change infection rates. Measuring hand hygiene on the other hand may help infection rates immensely.

While benchmarks need to be specific and measurable it is also important to learn from what and how others benchmark who have the same goals as you do. Diving into the specifics of the goal, the process, the measurement (benchmark), and the outcome are all equally important when trying to set and achieve a specific benchmark.

One thing that stuck out to me specifically is watching what others use as important benchmarks in providing care. My doctor uses lab values when he wants to justify a certain type of care for me and then also incorporates symptoms when he wants to deviate from what the lab values would indicate. It has spurred me on to be much more specific in managing my own care. There was a time I would trust my care to my doctor blindly and those days are over.

Benchmarking can also be compared to effectiveness. When I am speaking with a patient I inform them of what I think is going on with their care. We discuss what the Doctor has told them, what they are feeling, what role medications and treatment may be playing in the process, and each of these can have a type of benchmark tied to it. Even if you call that benchmark “normal response” or “expected response,” even an “unexpected response” incorporates a benchmark that we are either not meeting or exceeding. This weeks lessons helped me to realize I need to be specific and factual in how I perform any task as a nurse and critically evaluate my care against a benchmark of “High Quality Care!!”

Also this week I have purchased a new computer. I utilized industry standards, or “benchmarks,” to determine what make and model would be best suited to my needs. As a result of this new make and model, it is processing my images differently than in previous weeks. I have a benchmark meme that I have “inserted” into this post, yet doesn’t seem to want to show itself…..

We’ll see how well I overcome the obstacles of this new standard of computer my benchmarking helped me pick out. It would appear that this week my performance has declined with regards to media and I will need to re-evaluate and alter my knowledge to produce better results by incorporating proper media…..

Polynesian and Nursing Care

It’s called “The American Dream,” when you consider that nightmares are dreams I guess it makes sense. In the United States we push for bigger, better and more in all that we do. Everywhere we spread the “American Dream” we spread obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, technology that leads to a sedentary lifestyle and portion sizes that could feed a small family.

As I was reading about Polynesians and nursing care this week, I came across on article that references Captain Cook’s first contact with the Native Hawaiian people. He described them as healthy looking and muscular with almost no obesity. Today obesity is so common among pacific islanders that it is the norm for both men and women.

We try to spread Americanism everywhere we go. It doesn’t make a lot of sense and it is illustrated very well by the following story.

http://bemorewithless.com/the-story-of-the-mexican-fisherman/

Native Americans and Identity

As we studied the Native American culture this week I learned something very important. I have heard throughout my life not to judge a book by its cover. This was illustrated very well in an article I read on Native Americans. The article said that someone might look like an American Indian and not participate in the culture at all, and there might be someone who is blond hair and blue eyed who is fully immersed in the Native American Culture.

The most important thing we can do as clinicians is to ask our patients questions. Not only our medical questions but personal questions about who they are and what they believe regarding their own healthcare. Yes, they have come to us to help solve their medical problems, but they may have some strong beliefs about how they would like us to go about doing just that. We need to ask.

The Deaf Culture

We had an assignment this week to watch a movie with no sound, only subtitles. It was an extremely difficult assignment. I had never seen the movie before and I knew I was missing out on so much emotion and feeling from not being able to hear the music, expressions, tones and other noises I take for granted everyday. This was a great assignment to demonstrate to me how it feels to be in a minority culture. I felt like I was missing so much that I knew was there. I’m sure there are far more set backs from being deaf than just having to read subtitles, but this assignment was very effective.

While the assignment was specific to the Deaf culture it can be applied to any culture. As a nurse it will be extremely important to be sensitive to the needs of my patients. This really demonstrated the need for me to also be culturally sensitive as well! I need to be pro-active in recognizing when my patients are missing something. Whether that be a language barrier, a medical understanding of what is going on with their care, and most importantly, my attention. If my attention is somewhere else then they aren’t receiving the care that they need to heal properly.